Michael Sam, first openly gay Division I College football player and NFL draft prospect, reacts to being drafted by the St. Louis Rams (May 10, 2014) [x]

sillylovesongs:

February 9, 1964
Exactly 50 years ago today, The Beatles performed at the Ed Sullivan Show for the first time. This event officially began the craze known as Beatlemania.

life:

On the 80th anniversary of the first drive-in theater, a series of photos celebrating two abiding American obsessions: cars and movies.
(J. R. Eyerman—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

life:

On the 80th anniversary of the first drive-in theater, a series of photos celebrating two abiding American obsessions: cars and movies.

(J. R. Eyerman—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

criminalwisdom:

MORTSAFES

Mortsafes were contraptions designed to protect graves from disturbance. The necessity for medical students to learn anatomy by attending dissections of human subjects was frustrated by the limited allowance of dead bodies - the corpses of executed criminals - granted by the government. As such, there had been body-snatching close to the schools of anatomy in Scotland since the early 18th century.
Many people were determined to protect the graves of newly deceased friends and relatives. The rich could afford heavy table tombstones, vaults, mausolea and iron cages around graves. The poor began to place flowers and pebbles on graves to detect disturbances and dig heather and branches into the soil to make disinterment more difficult. Large stones, often coffin-shaped, sometimes the gift of a wealthy man to the parish, were placed over new graves. Friends and relatives took turns or hired men to watch graves through the hours of darkness. Watching societies were often formed in towns, one in Glasgow having 2,000 members. But graves were still violated.
The mortsafe was invented in about 1816. These were iron or iron-and-stone devices of great weight, in many different designs. Often they were complex heavy iron contraptions of rods and plates, padlocked together - examples have been found close to all Scottish medical schools. A plate was placed over the coffin and rods with heads were pushed through holes in it. These rods were kept in place by locking a second plate over the first to form extremely heavy protection. It would be removed by two people with keys. They were placed over the coffins for about six weeks, then removed for further use when the body inside was sufficiently decayed.
[There are some fantastic examples of these still intact at Glasgow Necropolis]

(Source: theoddmentemporium)

criminalwisdom:

MORTSAFES

Mortsafes were contraptions designed to protect graves from disturbance. The necessity for medical students to learn anatomy by attending dissections of human subjects was frustrated by the limited allowance of dead bodies - the corpses of executed criminals - granted by the government. As such, there had been body-snatching close to the schools of anatomy in Scotland since the early 18th century.

Many people were determined to protect the graves of newly deceased friends and relatives. The rich could afford heavy table tombstones, vaults, mausolea and iron cages around graves. The poor began to place flowers and pebbles on graves to detect disturbances and dig heather and branches into the soil to make disinterment more difficult. Large stones, often coffin-shaped, sometimes the gift of a wealthy man to the parish, were placed over new graves. Friends and relatives took turns or hired men to watch graves through the hours of darkness. Watching societies were often formed in towns, one in Glasgow having 2,000 members. But graves were still violated.

The mortsafe was invented in about 1816. These were iron or iron-and-stone devices of great weight, in many different designs. Often they were complex heavy iron contraptions of rods and plates, padlocked together - examples have been found close to all Scottish medical schools. A plate was placed over the coffin and rods with heads were pushed through holes in it. These rods were kept in place by locking a second plate over the first to form extremely heavy protection. It would be removed by two people with keys. They were placed over the coffins for about six weeks, then removed for further use when the body inside was sufficiently decayed.

[There are some fantastic examples of these still intact at Glasgow Necropolis]

(Source: theoddmentemporium)

wetheurban:

MATCHING CINEMATIC STILLS WITH REAL LIFE

Bless this man! Photographer and dedicated cinephile, Christopher Moloney, travels throughout New York with a few black and white film stills in tow to capture intriguing juxtapositions of said stills against their real-life locations. 

Since the success of his original photo (a shot of Matt Damon and Emily Blunt running in “How to Murder Your Wife”), Christopher Moloney has recreated more than 250 scenes in New York, Toronto, Chicago and Asia, including moments from “The Avengers,” “Breakfast at Tiffany’s,” “You’ve Got Mail,” “The Dark Knight Rises” and “Shaft.” Check out more of these awesome images after the jump:

Read More

Wasn’t he beautiful?  
Tonight is San Diego Remembers Matthew Shepard.  We have been planning the event for a few months, and it all comes down to tonight.  This is my second year on the planning committee and the event means so much to me.  Matthew Shepard’s death in 1998 was when I decided that I had found my fight, standing alongside my LGBT friends and allies.  Standing up for equality and against discrimination, hate and bullying.  

Wasn’t he beautiful?  

Tonight is San Diego Remembers Matthew Shepard.  We have been planning the event for a few months, and it all comes down to tonight.  This is my second year on the planning committee and the event means so much to me.  Matthew Shepard’s death in 1998 was when I decided that I had found my fight, standing alongside my LGBT friends and allies.  Standing up for equality and against discrimination, hate and bullying.  

I saw a photo like this a few months ago and I knew I wanted to make one with Gary.  With all the stuff going on with Chick-fil-A, I thought now was a good time.  Really makes you think, doesn’t it?

I saw a photo like this a few months ago and I knew I wanted to make one with Gary.  With all the stuff going on with Chick-fil-A, I thought now was a good time.  Really makes you think, doesn’t it?

Time to get ready for Harvey Milk St. to be UNVEILED!!

First in the NATION.

yayponies:

It’s a time-honored tradition at Navy homecomings – one lucky sailor  is chosen to be first off the ship for the long-awaited kiss with a  loved one. Today, for the first time, the happily reunited couple was gay.
The dock landing ship Oak Hill has been gone for nearly three months, training with military allies in Central America.
As the homecoming drew near, the crew and ship’s family readiness  group sold $1 raffle tickets for the first kiss. Petty Officer 2nd Class  Marissa Gaeta bought 50 - which is actually fewer than many people buy,  she said, so she was surprised Monday to find out she’d won.
Her girlfriend of two years, Petty Officer 3rd Class Citlalic Snell, was waiting when she crossed the brow.
They kissed. The crowd cheered. And with that, another vestige of the policy that forced gays to serve in secrecy vanished.
By Corinne Reilly  The Virginian-Pilot© December 21, 2011 

yayponies:

It’s a time-honored tradition at Navy homecomings – one lucky sailor is chosen to be first off the ship for the long-awaited kiss with a loved one.
Today, for the first time, the happily reunited couple was gay.

The dock landing ship Oak Hill has been gone for nearly three months, training with military allies in Central America.

As the homecoming drew near, the crew and ship’s family readiness group sold $1 raffle tickets for the first kiss. Petty Officer 2nd Class Marissa Gaeta bought 50 - which is actually fewer than many people buy, she said, so she was surprised Monday to find out she’d won.

Her girlfriend of two years, Petty Officer 3rd Class Citlalic Snell, was waiting when she crossed the brow.

They kissed. The crowd cheered. And with that, another vestige of the policy that forced gays to serve in secrecy vanished.

By Corinne Reilly
The Virginian-Pilot
© December 21, 2011